All posts by Arwen

A Sonnet on Reading

©Arwen LeQuieu

Sitting in my comfy chair
A stack of books and a cup of tea
Leaving behind worldly care
In an afternoon where I am totally free.

In my garden hammock laying
Bare feet and face turned towards the sun
Relaxing, for the hour staying
In the pages of a book undone.

My little attic hideaway
Quite the quiet place to be
On the dusty little bed I lay
Dancing black letters of a book to see.

All of my favorite reading place
Are far away from rat races.

Top Ten Tuesday #21

toptentuesdayTop Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish in June 2010.

April 18, 2017: Top Ten Things That Will Make Me Instantly Want To Read A Book (topic originally done back in 2013 as top ten words/topics that will make me instantly want to read a book) — so yeah basically any topic or theme or ANYTHING (ie if X person recommends it) that will make you instantly want to pick up a book.

My reading habits have been called eclectic before, and that’s because I’m just as likely to have my nose in a Nancy Drew book as I am the Brothers Karamazov. My taste ranges from fantasy to science fiction, from Greek tragedy to modern poetry, and from Christian Fiction to YA Dystopian. That being said, yes there are somethings that will draw me to a book more that other things, and here is an un-ordered list of ten of those.

Top Ten Topics That Make Me Want to Read A Book

    1. Greek Mythology – I love Greek tragedy and try to fit at least 1 Greek play into my reading every year. But I also like to see Greek mythology remixed, retold, twisted or simply alluded to. It’s why I took a chance on Venom & Vanilla, even though I don’t normally like Urban Fantasy. One of my favorites in the category: Nobody’s Princess.

    1. Stephen R Lawhead – Lawhead is my favorite author. I have read every book by him, and own most of them. I especially like his Robin Hood and Arthurian retellings. My favorite book of all time is Dream Thief.

    1. Arthurian Retellings – If it has Merlin, Arthur, or the Knight of the Round Table in it I probably want to read it. I am an Arthur junkie. (Although I admit to not being able to get into the series Merlin, for some reason.) I already mentioned Lawhead’s retelling, an interesting one I read lately was Shadowland: A Tale From The Dark Ages.

    1. Dreams – I enjoy stories where the main character is drawn into their dreams, or lives another life in their dreams, or just where dreams play a major part in the real world. I’ve already mentioned how much I love Dream Thief, another one you may want to check out is Dreamlander

    1. Good Fantasy World Building – I don’t look for just any fantasy story, I want one I can loose myself in. Which is why The Lord of the Rings is awesome. Nothing takes me out of the story faster than a world in which the characters don’t seem to fit. But if I hear from other reviewers that the world building really drew them in, it’s a bet that the book is going into my TBR. Check out the The Midnight Sea(The Fourth Element, #1) for some great world building.

    1. Newbery – One of my major reading goals is to read through all the Newbery books. I fell really behind on this last year, but am hoping to get up to speed again this year. One of the best of the titles I’ve read so far is Holes.

    1. Archers – This one is especially true of comics, but two of my childhood heroes where Robin Hood and William Tell (thanks to two BBC series on PBS.) So when Lawhead came out with his Hood series I was tickled pink. And I also loved The Hunger Games.

    1. Philip K. Dick – Is another author I love and will read pretty much anything I can get my hands on. It’s crazy with the amount of books he’s written how hard it is to come across them second hand. Second Variety, is a short story of his that I am still thinking about (and creeped out by) years after reading it. My favorite novel of his is Deus Irae, which I’ve read at least twice.

    1. Nancy Drew & Hardy Boys 1st Edition – This one may sounds a little weird, but I look for and collect the original Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books, it’s doesn’t have to really be 1st edition just the original copyright before they were changed. That’s right, the stories have been updated several times to change jargon and make them more modern. I recently picked up the original The Secret of Red Gate Farm.

Origndtsorgf.jpg
By Source, Fair use, Link

    1. Finished Series – I kinda hate having to wait for the next book to come out. So if I stumbled on an already finished series that sparks my interest I’d much rather read that. And if I can pick up the whole thing for Kindle at a good price that helps too. It’s why I read the Chronicles of the Nameless Dwarf, which was a total hoot. I also really enjoyed The Five Kingdoms series.

Runner up: Dystopian – I used to love dystopian fiction and this had been a reason to pick up a book, but now the market is SO flooded. It’s like everything has to have a dystopian setting.

Do you related to any of these? What is something make make you instantly want to pick up a book? Leave me a comment below.

Top Ten Tuesday #20

toptentuesdayTop Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish in June 2010.

April 11, 2017: Top Ten Of The Most Unique Books I’ve Read Some variations: top ten unique sounding books on my TBR, top ten most unique books I’ve read in X genre, etc.

This is a pretty big category to wrap my head around. What makes a book unique? Is it the publisher, the rarity, the binding? Is it some gimmick, some limited edition thing? Is the the plot, the characters, the setting? Any of these things could be the right answer. There are a lot of ways books can be unique, and its one of the reason so many enjoy collecting them.

For this list I’m going to focus on books the look unique. This is mostly inspired by my local used book seller and his Instagram account, browsersbookstore.  I’m going to be using post from them and other Instagram book sellers / #bookstagram to complete this list.

Top Ten Unique Books

Why? Because little books are fun and also because it’s double history, the history of the Emancipation Proclamation in a book that is history itself.

Why? I freely admit to being a James Bond fan girl (As long as we leave Daniel Craig aka WORST BOND EVER, out of it.) I am working my way through the full collection of trade paper back my sister gave me, but there is something special about first editions.

First edition Mickey Mouse reading Gullivers Travels! #arthurrackham #rarebooks #mickeymouse #childrensbooks #illustrations

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Why? The cover is beautiful enough on it’s own, but illustrations of Mickey Mouse reading Gullivers travels? Priceless!

Why? Exquisite! Plus I love all thing Arthurian and Art Nouveau, which this book combines.

Think you have everything Lord of the Rings? #fantasy #MiddleEarth

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Why? I thought I did, but I’ve never heard of this book before. (I even own The Fellowship in Mandarin Chinese, which I picked up while teaching English in China mind you.) We have a whole Tolkien shelf combing the multiple copies and different edition we have of the books. And of course my husband claims to be the ultimate Tolkien fan because he married Arwen. 😊

Some amazing #bindings bound by #Cedricchivers will be on display at the #newyorkantiquarianbookfair, visit our booth E10

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Why? Another beautiful Art Nouveau piece of work. You could just look at these book all day long.

This finely bound Book of Common Prayer is noteworthy because of its stunning bejewelled binding after a design by William Burges, with five brass-mounted semi-precious stones on each board together with two elaborate armorial brass clasps, again set with stones. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀William Burges was one of the pre-eminent figures of the Victorian mediaeval revival. This work was commissioned by Lord and Lady Ripon. Studley Royal and St. Mary's Churches were both built for the Ripons between 1871 and 1878. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀Tragically the funds for these builds came from unspent ransom cash from a kidnap that went wrong and which ended in the death of a good friend of the family, Frederick Grantham Vyner. He had been apprehended by Greek bandits during an expedition to Marathon and was shot, along with three friends, in an ensuing gun battle with armed troops. Vyner's mother and her sister Lady Ripon then decided to dedicate the unused ransom money to this memorial project. #beautiful

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Why? The history behind this amazing looking book could be a book itself. The book is in great condition looking almost new.

Why? Because it made me laugh. Chicken scratch… from scratch…KGB Chicken… who comes up with this stuff?

Why? Again it’s a little book and tiny books are cool. And somehow this one has text find inside it in two languages.

Why? In case you didn’t know my day time job is as a freelance content manager and website developer. I’ve been doing a lot of code work lately so this one just stood out, even though it on morse code and not computer code.

Bonus:

These awesome bookends…

Lovely bookends my partner gave me for my birthday a couple of years ago:).

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National Library Week: 7 Ways to Celebrate Your Library

Did you know that 73.1% of libraries provide programs that assist individuals apply for jobs, create resumes, and prepare for interviews?

Today is the beginning of National Library Week. It’s a great time to remember all the good things libraries do for our communities, and to go a visit your local library. But there are many ways to support your library, and they probably need the extra support as many are facing tight budgets and some libraries in Oregon have even been forced to close.

Here in Albany, Oregon the library board is doing a #LibrariesTransform campaign with yard signs around town. Our goal is to help people think about the libraries and everything they do for the community. Libraries besides being a place of

Children with less exposure
to books face tougher learning challenges in school and beyond. 75% of state prison inmates can be classified as low literate.

learning and literacy also host public programs, offer internet access, and help with things like tax preparation and medicare paper work. Our library carries books, audiobooks, ebooks, music cd’s, dvd’s and Blu-rays, educational software and video games, puppets and more. Plus our children’s area is the best indoor playground in town; with a puppet theatre, puzzles and games, over sized soft blocks, sensory tubes and even a play kitchen.

Check out the library calculator to find out just how much your library use might be worth.

7 Ways to Celebrate Your Library

  1. Share it on Social – What is your librarian an expert in—storytime, medieval history, recommending books—or are they an expert in making you smile?  Let the world know that you appreciate your “expert in the library” using the images at I Love Libraries and the hashtag #expertinthelibrary. Post between Saturday, April 8 at noon CT and Saturday, April 15 at noon CT for a chance to win the $100 Visa gift card (see site for details.) Extra points if you tag your library in the post.

Libraries Transform: My librarian is expert at...(animation) storytime, tracking down obscure citations, making me smile. Tell us about the expert in your library for a chance to win!

Also make sure to use the hashtags #LibrariesTransform and #NationalLibraryWeek.

  1. Visit Your Library – If it’s possible go every day this week. Most libraries have some sort of door counter, and the number of visitors matter when it comes time to talk about budget for staffing. If your library can show decision makers that people are still coming and using the library it makes a big difference.
  2. Join the Friends of the Library – Most libraries have these group dedicated to helping support their library. Besides offering support, helping with volunteers, most of the Friends of the Library groups put on great programs at the Library. This is another number that the library can take to the budget committee. For our local library it only costs $20/year for a family membership.
  3. Send A Thank You Note – April 11th is National Library Workers day. Brighten the staff’s day by sending them a thank you note and let them know you appreciate your library.
  4. Write A Letter to the Editor – Send a letter to your local paper and let them know you support your libraries. Share a personal story. Talk about the library calculator above. Or just give your library a big shout out.
  5. Go to a Fundraiser – Our library just finished their 3rd Library Uncorked fundraiser. It was a night of wine and hors d’oeuvres in the library accompanied by live music and a silent auction. It was a great way to support the library. Our library also has an annual book sale. Other libraries may have 5k Runs, cook-offs, or donation drives. Be a part of the next fundraiser to support your library.
  6. Go to a City or County Budget Meeting – OK I know they are long and boring, but the thing is if you show up you have a HUGE impact. It’s your government and you do get a say, tell them you support your library. If you’re feeling frisky ask them when was the last time they visited the library. Challenge them with these facts on Libraries Matter or from Libraries Transform.

How will you show support for your library during National Library Week? Leave me a comment to let me know.

 

The Top 50 Sci-Fi TV Shows Ever (Checklist)

Taken from the IGN list: TOP 50 SCI-FI TV SHOWS (Cylons and Vulcans make our top 50, but does Alf?) To read about the show please check out IGN’s post. This is my checklist. Note this is IGN’s order not mine. Personally I think there are too many anime titles on this list. With so much great live action sci-fi tv to choose from I would have left off more of the anime and included shows like Dark Angel, Sliders, Dollhouse, and Earth 2. How in the world did Roughnecks get left off this list?!

I’ve seen 16 of the shows on this list. Watched full series marked in blue and bold. Watched partial series marked in blue. On the To-watch list marked in green. Have no intention of ever watching.

50 Space: Above and Beyond
49 Caprica
48 Star Trek: The Animated Series
47 Amazing Stories
46 The Invaders
45 The Wild Wild West
44 Roswell
43 Buck Rogers in the 25th Century
42 Lost in Space
41 Voltron: Defender of the Universe
40 Eureka
39 Robotech
38 The Jetsons
37 Battle of the Planets (Gatchaman/G-Force)
36 Max Headroom
35 The Six Million Dollar Man
34 Aeon Flux
33 Stargate Universe
32 The Transformers
31 Nowhere Man
30 Star Wars: The Clone Wars
29 Cowboy Bebop
28 Life on Mars
27 The 4400
26 Neon Genesis Evangelion
25 Quantum Leap
24 The Adventures of Briscoe County, Jr.
23 Alien Nation
22 Star Blazers/Space Battleship Yamato
21 Farscape
20 Red Dwarf
19 Stargate SG-1
18 Fringe
17 Torchwood
16 Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles
15 Futurama
14 V
13 Babylon 5
12 Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
11 Mystery Science Theater 3000
10 Firefly
9 The Outer Limits
8 The Prisoner
7 Star Trek: The Next Generation
6 Lost
5 The X-Files
4 Doctor Who
3 The Twilight Zone
2 Star Trek
1 Battlestar Galactica

Top Ten Tuesday #19

toptentuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish in June 2010.

April 4, 2017: Fandom Freebie — top ten fandoms I’m in, 10 reasons X fandom is the best, must have merchandise for x fandom, etc. etc.

How to pick just ten when Firefly is one of the most perfectly conceived and well made shows ever? (And it’s even a Sci-fi Western, yes they somehow pulled that off.) So instead I’m going to countdown my favorite characters from the show, and because Firefly is a needs to been seen, I’m going to do this post all clippy. I’ll also try my best not to use any spoilers, but be warned just in case I let one slip.

Firefly Character Countdown

  1. Simon – A handsome, well educated doctor from a wealthy family. A lot of girls would swoon, but not me. One of the main motivators from the larger plot arch of the series and the movie, he’s necessary but he’s not my favorite. However he does occasionally have a good line. And you gotta love his commitment to protecting his sister.

  1. Inara – A Companion, guild-certified high class prostitute, who rents a shuttle from Serenity to have a mobile business. Again necessary to the plot and as a love foil for the Captain, but I just don’t like her that much. She is smart and independent and professional and in control of her sexuality- everything a good feminist roll model should be. Maybe that’s why I don’t like her that much, it too overt, too obvious. I know Joss Weadon is a feminist and he really does a good job of creating strong feminine characters, but in Inara he goes over the top.

  1. Kaylee – The ships mechanic and sort of mascot, who is eternally optimistic and bright (both in her clothing and personality and intellegence.) I do like Kaylee, and the only reason she is further down on this list is that the other characters are just that much stronger. If the show had lasted longer we may have gotten to have more Kaylee episodes.

  1. River – The troubled younger sister of Simon, who seems to have some interesting talents. Talents the government wants, and they will do anything to get River back into their custody. The show and the crew wouldn’t be the same without her. She gives them all (except Jayne) a little sister to put up with, to defend, to unite around. Plus the mystery surrounding her keeps the plot jumping.

  1. Shepherd Book – A man of faith searching for his place in the ‘Verse, who stumbled across Serenity and who can’t seem to let go of the family he found there even if the Captain is hostile to his religion. Book has a mystery around his past, and is full of experience and wisdom for the crew. Without Book there would be no moral center at all, and I get the idea that this already drifting crew would really be lost.

  1. Serenity (The Ship) – I couldn’t do a character list without mentioning the ship herself. One of the great things about the show is how even the ship has a character arc, a history, a personality. And she is beautiful, I just love this ship. Serenity may not be the Enterprise, but she feel like some place I could call home.

  1. Wash – The spunky, hilarious, often childlike ship’s pilot. Nearly every line that Wash has in the show is funny, and in a way that feel totally natural. Sometimes a show will have a comic relief character who really feels forced, and who doesn’t really belong with the others. Wash is part of the Serenity family, he belongs, and his skill is necessary to get them out of a lot of sticky situations.

  1. Zoe – The strong and talented warrior woman who is second in command of Serenity. She has some seriously great lines like “Sir, I think you have a problem with your brain being missing,” and the famous tag line “Big Damn Heroes.” Zoe could be a really dark character, but she knows when to get down to business and when to take it easy. Still not someone who want to mess around with, she’s always half a second from violence.

  1. Mal – The Captain, the whole show kinda belong to him. While some of the others play supporting or motivating role it all revolves around Malcolm Reynolds whose strength of character keeps the whole thing together. There are times that literally things should not have worked out, when it was all going to pieces in a hurry, but it was Mal who willed them to happen. A lot of it is summed up in the “First Rule of Flying” that he gives River Tam at the end of Serenity, which I will include below.

  1. Jayne – He’s a true chaotic neutral, which makes him the kinda of gruff bad boy you always fall for in fiction. (And if that’s not your thing remember there’s plenty of other characters to swoon over.) Even the show knows how awesome Jayne is because they gave him his own hero song in the episode “Jaynestown.”

March 2017 Book Pick Ups

The Deliberate ReaderI am so far behind in my book pick up posts that I couldn’t hope to catch up, so I just decided to start fresh by posting just last months books.

Since our move I kinda settled down on picking up anything but kindle titles and kids books. We just have less space, and I have less time for personal reading right now. Hopefully as we get more settled in and use to our new routine that will change.

For Kindle:

The Daemoniac (Dominion Mysteries Book 1)
Why I got it: Because Kat Ross is an awesome author and I want to read more of her books. Go follow her on twitter and then check out my reviews for her other books Blood of the Prophet and Queen of Chaos.

Ella Dethroned
Why I got it: You know I forgot I had picked this one up, I’m assuming it was from Instafreebie or Book Bub. It’s the prequel to a fantasy series, and has mostly 4 and 5 star reviews. It sounds exciting so I’ll give it a shot.

The Silver Skull Preview
Why I got it: This one is going up to the front of my TBR list because it sounds so intriguing. Add Steampunk, plus spies, plus a dash of fantasy and I’m am in. (I believe this copy is just a sample though, and I will probably end up buying the full book.)

ARC:

Who Counts?: 100 Sheep, 10 Coins, and 2 Sons
Why I got it: I got this children’s book through the LibraryThing early readers program. I requested it because it looked like a good childrens book about some of the parables of Jesus. However I had mixed feeling about it. Read my review here.

eARC:

The Waterfall Traveler
Why I got it: I am going to review this book for Xpresso Book Tour in May. It sounds like a good fantasy story, with rouges, fugitives, conspiracies and someone the power to travel through water. Also, the cover is just amazing.

Kids Books:

The Little Grumpy Cat that Wouldn’t (Little Golden Book)
Why I got it: I picked this up from my Goddaughter’s school book fair, partly because she loves Grumpy Cat and partly because this year is Little Golden Books 75th anniversary. And the thought of Grumpy cat in a Little golden Book is hilarious.

Happy Birthday, Bad Kitty
Why I got it: It was .99 cents at St. Vinny’s and I am a big sucker for collecting all the books in a series. Plus this gives me more to read than Bad Kitty vs. Uncle Murray: The Uproar at the front door, which is her favorite bad kitty book and therefore I have read it about 4,00 times.

Bad Kitty Goes to the Vet
Why I got it: Same reasons as above, but this one we got from the book fair.

Mary Poppins
Why I got it: .99 cent at St. Vinny’s and it a book I’ve always wanted to read. Now that my goddaughter is a little older I’ve started reading chapter books to her, like Winnie-the-Pooh and I think we’ll try Mary Poppins too.

The Shy Little Kitten (Step into Reading)
Why I got it: I remember reading this book as a Little Golden book when I was a kid. The step into reading version is just right for my goddaughter to practice her reading aloud.

Cinderella (Step into Reading)
Why I got it: A cheap thrift store pick up. And like I said before I like to collect books in a series, and we already have a bunch of Disney princess Step Into Reading titles.

The Sweetest Spring (Step into Reading)
Why I got it: Ditto what I just said, but even more so because this one is part of a series-within-a-series of Disney princess seasonal books.

Tink’s Treasure Hunt (Step into Reading)
Why I got it: Another Thrift store find, and who doesn’t love Tink?

Misc:

National Geographic Inside the Medieval World 2017
Why I got it: This is actually what I’m reading right now. I saw it on a supermarket newsstand and picked it up because I’m intrigued by the Medieval World and a century-by-century guide is a great tool for understand the pieces of history.

 

Review: Who Counts? & A Morning with Grandpa

Because today, March 28th is Children’s Picture Book Day I’m going to share my review of the latest ARC picture books I’ve received. I don’t normally post them to my blog because they are often much shorter than my other reviews. Occasionally I will get a picture book to review and I always save them to read with my 6 year-old goddaughter.

Who Counts? 100 Sheep, 10 Coins, and 2 Sons

By Amy-Jill Levine
Pages: 40

Synopsis:

One sheep makes a difference. Without her something is missing. Now my flock is complete.

Oh, no! The man is missing his sheep! The woman is missing her coin! The father is missing his son! Can you help them find what they are looking for?

Who Counts? is a creative retelling of three popular parables: the lost sheep, the lost coin, and the prodigal son. As young readers count to help the characters find what s missing, Who Counts? teaches that every one of us counts in God s eyes and that everyone should feel counted.

The stories are beautifully illustrated with modern-day characters and a diversity of ethnicities so that all children will be able to see themselves in the stories.

Review:

I have mixed feelings about this book. It’s a 3-part retelling of some of the parables of Jesus. Using bright, colorful pictures it tells the story of the lost sheep, the lost coin, and the prodigal son. The first two stories are great, the ones about the sheep and the coin. But then on the third story, the lost/prodigal son, it goes kinda sideways. I agree with an earlier reviewer who said they were uncomfortable with the slant it took. In trying to make the third story more like the first two it changes the end of the parable a bit. Story-wise it makes sense, but Biblically it’s not a good interpretation. Otherwise I would be able to rate this book much higher.

Bottom Line:

Skip it. This book has a great idea, that just goes off course enough to make me uneasy with it.

A Morning with Grandpa


By Sylvia Liu
Pages: 32

Synopsis:

Mei Mei s grandpa is practicing tai chi in the garden, and Mei Mei is eager to join in. As Gong Gong tries to teach her the slow, graceful movements, Mei Mei enthusiastically does them with her own flair. Then Mei Mei takes a turn, trying to teach Gong Gong the yoga she learned in school. Will Gong Gong be able to master the stretchy, bendy poses? Winner of the LEE & LOW New Voices Award, this title celebrates, with lively spirit and humor, the special bond between grandparent and grandchild and the joy of learning new things together. Readers of all ages will want to try out some tai chi and yoga too!

Review:

A wonderful book! Both the pictures and story are just lovely. The book is about a little girl and her Grandfather spending a Sat morning together. The grandfather, Gong Gong, is outside doing Tai Chi, and the little girl, Mei Mei, wants to join. The illustrations flow with the story as they move through the poses, with Mei Mei not quite grasping the idea of Tai Chi movements. Then the story flips with Mei Mei trying to teach Gong Gong yoga moves, which he finds difficult to follow. Eventually they find a form that fits them both. A great story to use to introduce multicultural families to children, or to introduce yoga or Tai Chi to kids. The 6 year old loves this book!

Bottom Line:

Get it, if you’re looking to add more multicultural books to your child’s library. It’s a great book and has lots of potential for rereading or for classroom reading.

That’s it. What new picture books have you read lately? Let me know in the comments. And don’t forget to pick up a picture book today.

Top Ten Tuesday #18

toptentuesdayTop Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish in June 2010.

Since I’ve started blogging more regularlly I’ve

February 28, 2017: Freebie Top Ten Books With X Setting (top ten books set near the beach, top ten book set in boarding school, top ten books set in England, etc.)

I’m much more of a genre reader than one who thinks much about where a book is set. (I did do an earlier Top Ten Tuesday post on Books Set Outside to USA.) But for today’s picks I’m choosing books with a Scandinavian or Russian setting. Quite frankly, there’s going to be a lot of Elizabeth Boyer in this list.

Top 10 Books Set in A Scandinavian or Russian Setting

In no particular order: (If I have reviewed the book the title will be linked to my Goodreads review, the images are linked to Amazon.)

    1. The Troll’s Grindstone
    2. Troll Fell
    3. Number the Stars
    4. White Raven: The Sword of Northern Ancestors
    5. The Sword and the Satchel 
    6. The Thrall and the Dragon’s Heart
    7. The Crown and the Crucible
    8. The Curse of Slagfid
    9. A Doll’s House
    10. Crime and Punishment

Pocket 2016: Another 881,818 words

If you’ve been a long time reader of my blog you’ve probably heard me rave about Pocket before. It’s a free book marking and reading service that allows to to book mark blogs and article for reading later across your device platforms. I use it all the time, and really prefer reading on the Pocket platform to reading on most blogs. It’s clean and easy to read and I can set the font and size to my preference.

Again in 2016 I made it into the top 5% of readers on Pocket. Reading 881,818 words or about 19 books worth. My top 3 topics were; Health, Books, and Current Events. See more in my 2016 Pocket summary.

If you like to read blogs and article online I highly recommend Pocket. It will clean up your to-read book mark list and give you one place to keep all those articles. Plus at the end of the year you’ll get your own summary and can see how much your online reading is worth.