40 Sub-Genres and Types of Dystopian Society

A dystopia is a community or society that is undesirable or frightening (Wikipedia.) An imagined world or society in which people lead wretched, dehumanized, fearful lives (Merriam-Webster.) A dystopia is a fictional world where people live under a highly controlled totalitarian system. (Vocabulary.com)

There is a lot of discussion on what is or is not a dystopian society, and what fits into the genre. Today I’m throwing the net nice and wide. Seems like a good time to take a look at what’s out there in dystopian stories with all the COVID-19 craze (our state closed schools for the rest of the month.)

All of these stories (note: I’m including movies in this list) have societies that have frightening aspects, and they all have B-I-G dysfunctions. In my mind, that’s what defines a dystopia, it may look like a normal society or utopia, most of the people living there may be unaware of the dysfunctions, but when you get to the heart of it “things are rotten in the state of…”

Note: I’m only including titles I’ve read or watched. If your favorite dystopian story didn’t make the list leave me a comment!

  1. Blade Runner – Cyberpunk dystopian
  2. By the Feet of Men – Climate dystopia (see my review)
  3. Holes – Juvenile Detention dystopia
  4. Deus Irae – Post-apocalyptic dystopia
  5. Starship Troopers – Military dystopia
  6. Uglies – Beauty dystopia
  7. Numbers Game – Everybody has a score dystopia
  8. Logan’s Run – Society of Youth dystopia
  9. Firefly – Space Totalitarian dystopia
  10. The Matrix – Reality dystopia
  11. Partials – Near-extinction dystopia
  12. Hunger Games – Competition dystopia
  13. Divergent – Faction dystopia
  14. The Maze Runner – Puzzling dystopia
  15. Fury Road – Dystopia dystopia
  16. Unwind – teenagers aren’t real people dystopia
  17. Ender’s Game – Kids at war dystopia
  18. Fahrenheit 451 – Reading dystopia
  19. The Dark Tower – Wandering Gunslinger in a dystopia
  20. 1984 – Party line dystopia
  21. Powerless – Power = Privileged dystopia
  22. The Lunar Chronicles – Moon Mistress dystopia
  23. Mary Poppins – Gaslighting Nanny dystopia
  24. Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said – You’re forgotten dystopia
  25. Venom and Vanilla – Mythical Monster Segregation dystopia
  26. City of Ember – Escaping dystopia
  27. The Running Man – Cash Grab dystopia
  28. A Series of Unfortunate Events – No one cares properly for children dystopia
  29. The Door in the Wall – Plague caused dystopia
  30. Seventh Tower – Sun-Starved dystopia
  31. Ready Player One – Real world dystopia/ Virtual world paradise
  32. The Lathe of Heaven – Dream to dystopia
  33. Titan A.E. – Post Earth dystopia
  34. Lord of the Flies – Children run this dystopia
  35. Fight Club – Making a dystopia
  36. Equilibrium – Feelings dystopia
  37. Gattaca – Genetic dystopia
  38. Snowpiercer – Dystopia on rails
  39. NeverSea – Flooded dystopia
  40. The Scourge – What you can’t see dystopia

Whew! What a list to put together. I know I’ve left of quiet a few. What’s your favorite dystopian story? How would you define a dystopia?

Are you stuck at home because of COVID-19, if so what are you reading? Leave me a note in the comments section to let me know. ☺

99 Days (Red Proxy #2): Review

99 Days (Red Proxy #2)
by Keith Ward
341 pages
Genre: Fantasy
Release date: June 2017Book Reviews - Loved It

Synopsis:

Kertram is a contented man with a simple life. He likes the dangerous, but rewarding work of shepherding baby dragons. He loves his wife. The day his children are born makes him happier than he ever thought he could be.

But life betrays Kertram in a horrifying way when his village is attacked in a raid between warring regions. His wife is murdered and his babies kidnapped. He knows his newborns will be ritually sacrificed on the 99th day of their lives to satisfy the monstrous appetites of others — unless he can get there first.

He’s not alone. Joining him are a powerful witch who questions her powers; a remarkable soldier with a fatal secret; and a mountain guide with a mind so warped he can’t remember his own name.

His quest to save them may cost Kertram his life. But he doesn’t care; he only knows he has to go on, and each sunrise brings his newborns closer to death. Day 99 is coming.

His Wife: Murdered
His Children: Kidnapped
Their Sentence: Ritual Sacrifice in 99 Days
His Mission: Save them
His Chances: Hopeless
His Determination: Unstoppable

The countdown to life and death has begun.

Review:

I’ve put off this review because I just didn’t know if I could do the book justice. Have you ever read a book that you just enjoyed so much it was hard to put words to? That was 99 Days for me. It was the best book I read in 2017 and here I am 3 years later still trying to review it.

The world building of this book is an utterly unique idea. That life, the days and years left to a person can be transferred to another person via a ritual done by someone called a Span Seer.  The Span Seers can not only transfer life they can see the days allotted to a person, thus each newborn’s days are read and entered into a ledger.

This sets up a economy, of sorts, based of life, quality of life and privilege. This economy is accepted by most of the world, even our main character has had some Transfers. However after the kidnapping of his newborns he begins to question the practice and so does the Span Seer Danak who journeys with him to save his children.

The action and twists keep the book a fast read, and it left me thinking for a long time. Few books really get down to the nitty gritty of the meaning and worth of life (Unwind is the other book that comes to mind.)

Bottom Line:

I loved the idea of the world in 99 Days, and it was well done all around. I highly recommend it.

Goodreads / Amazon

“If you live forever, with the only goal to continue living, are you really living at all?”

40 Children’s Picture Books I Love

Once when our goddaughter was 4, I told her that I had to go to work, to which she asked “Why?” I answered her “Cause I’m a grown-up and I have to.” With a full-bellied laugh she said, “You’re not a grown-up!”

Well, when it comes to books I certainly enjoy reading more than just adult books. Children’s book still have a special magic for me. Even as the now 9-year-old goddaughter is transitioning to mostly reading chapter books I continue to enjoy reading picture books and still request them from the LibraryThing early reviewers group. In fact, that’s where a lot of these books came from. I have quite a lot of good discoveries that way.

Again I’m going to try not to repeat too many entries from my other “40 Lists.” But you can check them out here. And I am leaving out Children’s series, those might get put on another list.

40 Children’s Picture Books I Love

  1. Miss Brooks Love Books (and I don’t)
  2. I Will Not Read This Book
  3. How to Code A Sandcastle
  4. Sergeant Billy: The True Story of the Goat Who Went to War
  5. Grandpa’s Top Threes
  6. Invisible Lizard
  7. Sixteen Cows
  8. John Deere, That’s Who!
  9. Christmas Farm
  10. Phone Call with a Fish
  11. What Was I Scared Of?
  12. The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore
  13. The Gruffalo
  14. The Pink Umbrella
  15. Mud Soup
  16. Barn Storm
  17. The Potty Book for Girls
  18. Elmer
  19. The Blue Jackal
  20. A Morning With Grandpa
  21. The Shy Little Kitten
  22. The Poky Little Puppy
  23. Wake Up, Sun!
  24. Corduroy
  25. Make Way for Ducklings
  26. Llama Llama Red Pajama
  27. Olivia
  28. If You Give A Pig A Pancake
  29. The Little Engine That Could
  30. Katy The Snowplow
  31. Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel
  32. Put Me in the Zoo
  33. Chicka Chicka Boom Boom
  34. The Tale of Three Trees
  35. Stone Soup
  36. Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs
  37. The Giving Tree
  38. The Butter Battle Book
  39. Brave As a Bunny Can Be
  40. The Mitten String

That’s my list, but really it could have been twice as long. Picking ONLY forty was pretty difficult. The field of pictures books is rich. I’d love to know if you have a favorite that I missed.

Deconstructing Anxiety: Book Blitz

Deconstructing Anxiety The Journey from Fear to Fulfillment
by Todd E. Pressman, PhD
336 pages
Publisher:  Rowman & Littlefield
Release date:  January 2020
Genre:  Self-Help/How To, Adult Non-Fiction (18+)

Meet A New Book

Synopsis:

Content Rating: PG

In Deconstructing Anxiety, Pressman provides a new and comprehensive
understanding of fear’s subtlest mechanisms. In this model, anxiety is
understood as the wellspring at the source of all problems. Tapping into
this source therefore holds the clues not only for how to escape fear,
but how to release the very causes of suffering, paving the way to a
profound sense of peace and satisfaction in life.

With strategically developed exercises, this book offers a unique,
integrative approach to healing and growth, based on an understanding of
how the psyche organizes itself around anxiety. It provides insights
into the architecture of anxiety, introducing the dynamics of the “core
fear” (one’s fundamental interpretation of danger in the world) and
“chief defense” (the primary strategy for protecting oneself from
threat). The anxious personality is then built upon this foundation,
creating a “three dimensional, multi-sensory hologram” within which one
can feel trapped and helpless.

Replete with processes that bring the theoretical background into technicolor,
Deconstructing Anxiety provides a clear roadmap to resolving this human
dilemma, paving the way to an ultimate and transcendent freedom.
Therapists and laypeople alike will find this book essential in helping
design a life of meaning, purpose and enduring fulfillment.

BUY THE BOOK: