Review: The Breedling and The City in the Garden

the-breedling-and-the-city-in-the-gardenby Kimberlee Ann Bastian
Pages:  280
Date Finished: Oct 31, 2016
Book Reviews - Liked ItLiked It

Synopsis:

Absolute obedience, servitude, neutrality.

These were the laws that once governed Bartholomew, an immortal soulcatcher, until one ill-fated night when he was forced to make a choice: rebel against his masters or reveal an ancient, dangerous secret.

He chose defiance.

Imprisoned for centuries as punishment for his decision, Bartholomew wastes away—until he creates an opportunity to escape. By a stroke of chance, Bartholomew finds himself in the human world and soon learns that breaking his bonds does not come without a price. Cut off from the grace that once ruled him, he must discover a new magic in 1930s Chicago.

Armed with only a cryptic message to give him direction, Bartholomew desperately tries to resume the mission he had started so long ago. Relying on the unlikely guidance of the streetwise orphan Charlie Reese, Bartholomew must navigate the depressed streets of the City in the Garden. But in order to solve this riddle, he must first discover if choice and fate are one in the same.

Review:

Not so much a fantasy story as a tour of 1930’s Chicago with a little bit of “The Devil Went Down to Georgia” type mythology mixed in.

The Breedling and The City in the Garden, has a really warm narrative that slowly unfolds the mystery surrounding the character of Bartholomew as it takes you on a tour of depression era Chicago. The depth of the depression history draws you in and makes the unraveling bits of mythology that much more believable.

The characters and their discoveries and struggles are really what makes the story. Charlie the street smart orphan who has lost everything and is struggling to still be the man his mother wanted him to be. Bartholomew/Buck the otherwordly Breedling, who is trying to overcome centuries of grief and guilt and to finish his mission. The Devil, who Buck can’t shake and who has a too keen interest in Charlie. The mysterious and benevolent Father Van Lewen, and the brief glimpses we get of the characters from the world of Buck’s origin and the hints they give us of the true puzzle being unraveled.

Inter-playing ideas of destiny, free will, servitude and muniplation this story asked some big questions but leave them unanswered for the next story.

Bottom Line:

I’m unsure what to think of this book. I enjoyed reading it, but it wasn’t at all what I expected from the book description. This isn’t really a book for fantasy lovers, and those who regularly read heavily supernatural themed books (Like my Kindle First pick of this month Venom and Vanilla.) This is much more a book for fans of historical/period fiction who want to dip their toes into fantasy.

Purchase:
Amazon

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2 thoughts on “Review: The Breedling and The City in the Garden

    1. Thanks for taking the time to stop by my blog, and for the opportunity to read your book. I enjoyed my visit to your version of 1930’s Chicago.

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